September 8-9: Google Meet in Google Classroom Opening Days #1

Today, we did the following:

  1. “A Little About Yourself,” Quick Survey – Students undertook a survey called “A Little About Yourself…” in order for me to gauge student needs regarding technology.  Student undertook this in Google Classroom (please go to our Google Classroom page to see this posted).

    2. Top Ten Commandments of Risk Taking – Students opened up the next document posted on the class stream of Google Classroom, The Top Ten Commandments of Risk Taking.  We discussed each “commandment” and its significance.

3. Rules and Procedures – We reviewed the syllabus, clarifying any concerns along the way.

4. Posting A Concern – Students were given an anonymous survey form to fill out and submit, stating one concern they might have about our class.

April 21: “Into the Wild” – Forensic Photo Reporting!

Here is the assignment:

FORENSIC PHOTO REPORTING–

You and your friends are hiking on the Stampede Trail in the backcountry of the Alaskan Wilderness just outside Denali National Park.  You manage to cross the raging Teklanika River and 12 miles later, discover an old abandoned, rusted city bus.  It looks like it’s probably from the 1940s.  Intrigued, you approach the bus but you and your friends are immediately frozen in place when you smell a horrific stench emanating from the bus.  Not overly sure of what it is, you step into the passenger entrance of the bus.  The first things you see are a barrel stove outfitted with a stovepipe that pokes through the roof of the bus, a table with a short stack of paperback books, a notebook, pens and pencils, you also see a half-full 10 lbs. bag of rice.  You then realize this bus was hauled out there to probably serve as a wilderness shelter for hunters, hikers, backpackers and other trekkers.  All of a sudden, upon realizing this, you and your friends shift your heads to the rear where you notice a head sticking out of a sleeping bag on a makeshift mattress atop a rusty bedframe in the back of the bus.  To your immediate right on a little wooden endtable is an “old school” 1990 Minolta camera with film still in it.  You recognize it as one of the earlier models of cameras that still used celluloid film and that had a timer on it for people to take some of the world’s first “selfies.”  Outside the bus entrance is attached a note you overlooked.  It’s wedged into a seam along the bus doorframe.  Not more than 20 minutes later, two moose hunters approach on two ATVs.  With panic starting to swell amongst you and your friends, you inform them that you think there is a dead body inside the back of the bus.  One of the hunters gets off his ATV, walks around the outside of the bus to the back where a tree stump rests under the back window of the bus.  He steps up, looks inside the back window of the bus and sees the sleeping bag with the head sticking out.  The hunter reaches in, is able to pick the bag up just a little with the body still in it and is able to give it just enough of a good shake.  No response.  Walking back to his ATV to use the CB radio affixed to it, he radios the sheriff to get someone out there.  Forty-five minutes later, an Alaskan state trooper helicopter lands in a wide open shallow streambed near the bus.  The troopers evacuate the body along with all the items inside the bus that most likely belonged to this mystery person, especially the “old school” Minolta camera.  The authorities take out the film and develop the photos to reveal……

 

1. Open up the file marked ‘ITW – Photo Envelope (COVID version)

2. In this Word document, closely examine the five (5) photos along with the “S.O.S.” note found in the metal seam framing the bus entrance, along with another “Goodbye” note that was also found in the bus.

3. In the Word document, arrange the five (5) photos in what you think is the chronological order. You can zoom in and out, move them around the document and so forth.  Notice that each photo is assigned a letter.  Put these photos in chronological order (10 pts.).

4. Using the evidence of the five (5) photos that you put in chronological order as well as the two notes, YOU ARE THE DETECTIVE that has to reconstruct the narrative—the story—as to how this person met their end for the police report. The minimum length of this is a paragraph to at least a half a page (15 pts.).  **AVOID shooting for the length—that will take you more time than you want to put into this**  Instead, CHANGE YOUR MINDSET to this: reconstruct the narrative by focusing on using as much detail from the photos and the two notes to recreate a story that is flush with detail.  If you focus on doing that, achieving the length will take care of itself, you won’t have to worry about length as long as you focus on recreating the narrative with the details provided in the evidence.

 

  1. You can record the chronological order as well as the narrative on the attached report sheet (‘ITW – Report Sheet COVID version’) which you can download, type over and save then attach it in an email to me. Or you can print it out and write over it, snap a photo of what you wrote, attach it and send it to me in an email.  Or you can put all this information in an email itself and send it to me (just be sure to label which part is what).

DUE DATE: FRIDAY, APRIL 24, 2020 AT 11:59PM

GOOD LUCK!

 

April 14: Last Call For “Wild” Quick Write Paragraphs!

Hey Guys!

How’s it going? Here we are, well along into week 5 of this situation. This message is just an update to let you know that starting next Monday, April 20th, I will be assigning new material but it will still be part of our outdoor nonfiction unit. Therefore, if you still have not submitted your quick response paragraphs regarding Cheryl Strayed and “Wild,” the absolute last day is this Friday at 11:59pm to hand it in. Beyond that, I will not accept it anymore. Not to sound cold-hearted here but we’re zeroing in on a month of this adjusted living situation and I can only hope that all of us have found the necessary means to make said adjustments. Therefore, I will finally start to move ahead and introduce the 2nd half of the unit *HOWEVER* it will not be an avalanche of material. Remember, any questions or concerns, you can comment here, email Mrs. Becker or me, and we will gladly help out! Plus, if you want to arrange a Google Meet, let us know! Okay? I hope this finds you all well! A shout-out to those who have commented, thanks for doing so!

PS- Look at the previous blog entry for any and all materials pertaining to the “Wild” quick write paragraphs assessment!

Cheers,

Mr. Hartz

March 30: “Wild” Quick Write Assessment Materals Re-Post

  1. This is what I handed out to students roughly two-and-a-half weeks ago on Friday, 3/13:
  • The last excerpt from the novel, Wild, chapter 19, “Dream of a Common Language.”
  • The T.E.A. paragraph ‘Quick Write’ assessment (just like the nonfiction unit assessment).
  • The graphic organizer for this assessment.
  • And the cover sheet with instructions of what to do. NOTE: those of you who received this coversheet, let me remind you that, again, you *DO NOT HAVE TO DO THE LAST BULLET POINT* as I did not provide that material for you.  I didn’t want to start anything new just yet until we have clear and concise guidance from the District as to how we will proceed, both during and after this entire event which is still unfolding as I type this.

* Here’s my example of a T.E.A. paragraph response for this story.  Notice how I followed the graphic organizer.  YOU MAY *NOT* COPY ANY OF THIS—THIS INCLUDES WORD-FOR-WORD, STYLE, AND ALL ELSE.  Use it as a guide to frame and shape your own response using your own command of the English language as best as you can.  Remember, I’ve been writing a long, long time so avoid being intimidated by this example, okay?  But aim high for yourself!

2. Below are the other excerpts/chapters we read from the book Wild that you can use to help answer the assessment questions (inclusive of the chapter above):

3. For the handout on chapter 2, “Splitting,” below is the interview you need to view in order to answer those questions:

 

4. Some film and video to view in order to get a better understanding of this:

Three Wild Featurettes – Last year, we watched three (3) featurettes from the film DVD on bringing the book to life on the actual trail:

Featurette #1 – Bringing the Book Into the Wild

Featurette #2 – The Making of Wild

Featurette #3 – 94 Days

Have I mentioned that my email is: mhartz@wscschools.org ? 😉  I check school email every morning.  I will also check this email periodically and frequently if you have any questions or concerns about the TEA assessment as well as the “Splitting” questions and such.

March 23: GOOGLE CLASSROOM HAS BEEN SET UP

Hello Freshmen,

Each of our classes has been set up in Google Classroom this morning (3/22/20) so log in with your school ID at the following address:

https://edu.google.com/intl/en/products/classroom/?modal_active=none

This blog will still be operational as it currently is, where you can retrieve, review or read any assignments and engage any multimedia that will serve our purposes (if available to post).   Below is my first message to everyone in Google Classroom:

Hello My Young Freshmen!

We have entered uncharted territory on three fronts: 1.) Adjusting to life adapted to and dealing with a global pandemic, 2.) Organizing and implementing some type of routine to keep your education current and furthered if possible, and finally 3.) Mr. Hartz actually using Google Classroom for the first time (please be patient with me as I learn as I go). Stay tuned for further news and whatnot. Also–don’t forget the blog at: www.e1hartz.wordpress.com. Talk to you all soon! Be well! PS: LET YOUR CLASSMATES KNOW WE’RE UP AND RUNNING IN GOOGLE CLASSROOM!

<end message>

Talk soon, guys!

MARCH 20TH: All My English I Students Check Your School E-Mail

Hello Guys,

I sent you all an email message to your school email address asking how all of you are doing, coping, and managing.  Here is the link to log in to your school email:

https://mail.wscschools.org/owa/auth/logon.aspx?replaceCurrent=1&url=https%3a%2f%2fmail.wscschools.org%2fowa%2f

As stated in the previous entry, I will be checking this email every morning, noon, and night.  In the meantime, I have downloaded Zoom and Skype to my laptop at home.  I’m testing these apps to see how they work so perhaps in the future, we can facetime or video conference.  In the meantime, I hope you’re doing all right, guys!  Again, check your school email.

All the Best,

Mr. Hartz

March 16th: REMAINING WORK FOR *WILD* – (ALL SCHOOLS CLOSED UNTIL 4/20/20 DUE TO COVID-19)

HELLO EVERYONE!

I hope you’re all doing well, staying safe, and not driving your parents crazy yet 😉

  1. This is what I handed out to students on Friday, 3/13:
  • The last excerpt from the novel, Wild, chapter 19, “Dream of a Common Language.”
  • The T.E.A. paragraph ‘Quick Write’ assessment (just like the nonfiction unit assessment).
  • The graphic organizer for this assessment.
  • And the cover sheet with instructions of what to do. NOTE: those of you who received this coversheet, let me remind you that you *DO NOT HAVE TO DO THE LAST BULLET POINT* as I did not provide that material for you.  I didn’t want to start anything new just yet until we have clear and concise guidance from the District as to how we will proceed, both during and after this entire event which is still unfolding as I type this.

* Here’s my example of a T.E.A. paragraph response for this story.  Notice how I followed the graphic organizer.  YOU MAY NOT COPY ANY OF THIS—THIS INCLUDES WORD-FOR-WORD, STYLE, AND ALL ELSE.  Use it as a guide to frame and shape your own response using your own command of the English language as best as you can.  Remember, I’ve been writing a long, long time so avoid being intimidated by this example, okay?  But aim high for yourself!

2. Below are the other excerpts/chapters we read from the book Wild that you can use to help answer the assessment questions (inclusive of the chapter above):

3.  For the handout on chapter 2, “Splitting,” below is the interview you need to view in order to answer those questions:

 

4. Some film and video to view in order to get a better understanding of this:

Three Wild Featurettes – Last year, we watched three (3) featurettes from the film DVD on bringing the book to life on the actual trail:

Featurette #1 – Bringing the Book Into the Wild

Featurette #2 – The Making of Wild

Featurette #3 – 94 Days

So there we have it, folks!  Good luck to all of you.  My email is: mhartz@wscschools.org. I check school email every morning.  I will also check this email periodically and frequently if you have any questions or concerns about the TEA assessment as well as the “Splitting” questions and such.  And if you have any questions in general, just email me, okay guys?  Stay safe, stay clean, stay smart about all of what’s happening around us, okay guys?  And avoid panicking, we *WILL* get through this.  Talk soon!  Cheers!

Clean and Calm for COVID,

Mr. Hartz

March 12-13: *Wild* chapter 3, “Hunching Over in a Remotely Upright Position” – The True Gear Check

Today, we did the following:

  1. FEAR Time.

2. Chapter 3 of Wild, “Hunching in a Remotely Upright Position” – We read this chapter which entails Cheryl Strayed’s gear assembly and packing.  Interspersed throughout this reading were tales of my own experiences, especially with the outdoor store REI which is where Strayed purchased all of her gear.

3. Wild (2014) – Film clip of today’s reading illustrating the enormous amount of gear Strayed carried for the first leg of her trek.

March 10-11: *Wild* – Carrying Our Baggage – Chapter 2, “Splitting”

Today, we did the following:

  1. FEAR Time.

2. Our Baggage – Students took out a half sheet of paper, did NOT write their name on it, and answered the following question: What is one personal issue you would like work on?  Then students folded the paper in half and put it in my INBOX.  I randomly picked each slip and read aloud the responses.  Responses ranged from “working on self-confidence,” to “getting my grades on order,” to “dealing with my parents’ divorce,” and on and on.

3. Wild, Chapter 2, “Splitting” – We read all of chapter 2 from Wild, entitled, “Splitting.”Students received a handout with five comprehension questions. Also, students answered the lesson’s Essential Question on the back: What reasons did Cheryl Strayed have to hike the PCT?  HOMEWORK: ANSWER THE FIVE QUESTIONS ONLY ON THE HANDOUT!!!!!